The War Without Bullets – Climate change, poverty and inequality radio show with Sunny Govan Radio

Do you understand the links between poverty and climate change? Are you concerned and want to take action? Would you like to celebrate the spirit of people and communities campaigning on these issues?

As a community activist, informed by her reading of popular education, community activism and radical politics, Cathy McCormack has – for over quarter of a century – witnessed each and every day a ‘war without bullets’ being waged remorselessly against herself and other structurally oppressed people: the poor, the ill, the unemployed, the disabled, the stigmatised, the marginalised and the simply different.

The War Without Bullets project is aimed at tackling this war.

The War Without Bullets Climate change, poverty and inequality radio show is an opportunity to open dialogue on the hidden forces at play around social and environmental justice and empower ideas for community action. The show is a form of a ‘Listening Project’ – a popular education organising tool especially useful in exploited communities where one-on-one interviews address issues of concern Re-framing the poverty/ inequality/ climate debate in terms of power, and if course the power of resistance, is exactly what we need to do in order to pull ourselves out of superficial politics.

The first radio shows will soon be up here on podcast for communities to use for their own self-determination.

The ‘War Without Bullets’ film AND Cathy’s ‘At the Sharp End of the Knife’ with True TV and Film will soon be up here to watch too.

We also explore whose views normally counts and gets listened too in the media. Use the War Without Bullets to explore and engage with the fight for social and environmental justice in the UK. Over the past year, a movement has developed using creative and empowering methods to highlight the deep-seated reasons we need to take action today. The reality that climate change and its impacts for poverty and pollution aren’t a mistake. Fossil fuel industries and the politicians who turn a blind eye to their impacts rely on the unequal burden placed on ourselves and our communities to uphold unequal power in the UK today. Anti-poverty and climate change campaigners and people concerned, who normally work independently, have been coming together across Scotland to expose the links between poverty, welfare reform and climate change. The aim of the radio show has been to open up dialogue on the hidden forces at play as we strive for social and environmental justice. Reframing the poverty/ inequality/ climate debate in terms of power, and of course the power of resistance, is exactly what we need to do in order to pull ourselves out of superficial politics.

Sunny Govan Radio (http://www.sunnygovancommunitymedia.org/index.php): Community radio aims to participate in the life of the community as well as enable that community to participate in the life of the station. The essential differences between community radio and other types of radio are: * It is run on a not-for-profit basis * It champions volunteering in the community (the majority of our on-air presenters and off-air helpers are volunteers who receive training in essential skills) * Individuals and community groups are actively encouraged to take a role in the station to ensure it succeeds in its objective to stimulate community development and capacity building. Whilst Govan is one of the most notoriously dangerous and economically marginalised areas of Glasgow it is famous for its working class spirit in leading the fights against the closure of the shipyards (Jimmy Reid), leading the protests against the poll tax and having a host of community struggles to tackle inequality. The first reach of Sunny Govan Radio is within Govan, with an active listenership of well over 150,000. Govan is a burgh on the South side of Glasgow. Secondly, Sunny Govan can be picked up in most parts of Glasgow aswell as throughout a large part of the central belt of Scotland.

Read more:

The War without Bullets: Socio-Structural Violence from a Critical Standpoint

Farewell Welfare: What can be done?